The Mouse-merized Cat

“Sleep! Sleep!”

Directed by Robert McKimson; Story by Warren Foster; Animation by Arthur Davis, Don Williams, Richard Bickenbach, and Cal Dalton; Layouts and Background by Richard H. Thomas and Cornett Wood; Effects Animation by A.C. Gamer; Voice Characterization: Mel Blanc; Musical Direction by Carl W. Stalling. A Merrie Melody released on October 19, 1946.

Remember Babbit and Catstello? Even if Tweety managed to get their fame, the two still managed a couple more pictures as mice. (Thus making them the only Warner Bros. characters to change species.) It’s clearly them and not just some lookalikes, the names are the same, the appearance is familiar, and they are still voiced by Pierce and Blanc, respectively. Still, for whatever reason, they only got two shorts as rodents, with this being the last of them.

Catstello, (which is a rather odd name for a mouse, but not THE worst. That distinction goes to Mortimer.) is excited to see us, the audience, but Babbit has more important matters to attend to. He’s reading a book about hypnotism, and he plans to entrance the chubby mouse, so said mouse will forget any fear of a cat, and get food from the deli in which they reside.

Naturally, the loss of free will is not something that Catstello wants any part in, and refuses to participate. Starting out by simply pretending it worked. He gives himself away when he refuses to mallet his own hand. Babbit refuses to accept that either hypnosis doesn’t work that way, or that his little pal could just be immune. (And why should he accept either one in a cartoon?) Still, Catstello tries to avoid the powers, protecting his eyes, and ducking. It’s no use though, Babbit finally gets him and now its time to test these powers.

It wouldn’t be a Warner Bros. Picture if they didn’t caricature some of the most popular people of the day, so Babbit starts by making his pal be Crosby, Sinatra, Durante, and Rochester. But any Warner character could do those, so the real test is to become a chicken. Sure enough, not only does Catstello cluck, but he even somehow lays and egg. (Or he just took it off a shelf. They are in a deli.)

Okay, how about we see this cat that’s in the title? Catstello is commanded to be a dog, and sent out to get the cat. His barking sends the cat into hiding, but upon seeing its just a mouse, the feline loses any and all fear. He even snaps Catstello out of the trance. The mouse flees in fear back to the hole, but Babbit rehypnotizes him out. In turn, the cat studies some hypnotism of his own and tries sending him back again. (He doesn’t just eat him because fat mice are high in cholesterol)

This goes on, but somehow in between the dueling hypnotists, Catstello is able to get his own will back and holds two mirrors out. Now they’ll see how funny hypnosis can be! With them caught in their own trances, Catstello can get them to do anything. He decides on the cat being a horse, and Babbit being a cowboy. With that done, he sends them out to hunt some varmint, and he is finally rid of them. With the whole place to himself, he does what anyone would do with an empty deli: eat.

Favorite Part: One of the ways Catstello resists the hypnosis. He reads a book entitled: “How to resist hypnotism.”

Feather Dusted

“What-ah say, what you need boy, is somethin’ more excitin’!”

Directed by Robert McKimson; Story by Charles McKimson and Sid Marcus. Animation by Rod Scribner, Phil DeLara, Charles McKimson, and Herman Cohen; Layouts by Robert Givens; Backgrounds by Richard H. Thomas; Voice Characterization by Mel Blanc (and Bea Benaderet); Music by Milt Franklyn. A Merrie Melody released on January 15, 1955.

Prissy is off to a party and is leaving her son at home. You may know this guy by sight already, but his name is Egghead Jr. (Although, nowadays he seems to go by Eggbert. Probably to differentiate himself from that other guy.) He doesn’t actually have a name in any of the three shorts he appeared in. Foghorn just calls him boy, and his mother tends to just calls him Junior. Speaking of Foghorn, he feels bad that the hen is telling her kid to just read while she is gone. (Also interesting is that she isn’t fawning over the rooster like pretty much every other time. Seeing him as a lazy oaf who could be a bad influence on her son) Well, since she isn’t going to be around to witness anything (and her son probably won’t tell anyway) Foghorn steals him away to play some typical little boy games. (Typical of the fifties. Mario Kart still needed a couple of decades to exist)

To start: a game of croquet. You may think that Foghorn has an unfair advantage, but you also might think that a kid named “Egghead” will at least be able to get some good shots in. He does indeed. Taking copious notes, he is able to figure out a way to hit the ball so it will pass through every wicket in one shot, and net him victory. Foghorn tries to point out how impossible the whole thing was, but he can’t argue with Jr.’s notes. (I mean, no matter how you look at it, the outcomes remains “I win.”)

Okay, how about cops and robbers? (I’ve only played that once. Is it more fun to be the cop?) Foghorn tells the boy to arrest him as he robs a bank. I love Jr.’s methods. He alerts the actual cops. (They’re all off screen because I doubt we could take the popo seriously if we saw them apprehending a chicken) Then, just to prove his intellect, Jr. marks out the spot Foghorn will emerge when he digs his way out of prison.

Playing pirates might work. (They’re both on the same side in this game.) Foghorn orders the kid to fire a cannon and the lad aims it in a rather unexpected way. Foghorn decides to fire it where he wants regardless, and the ricocheting cannonball comes back to bite him. Since they are already at a pond, why not go for a swim? Egghead refuses to get in, but does take up Foghorn’s challenge of trying to sink him. (He’s pretending to be a battleship) He unleashes a fleet of windup ships that take fire at the big bird.

Egghead is forced to fish him out, and that is where his mother finds him. Soaking wet, with an unconsciousness, wet, older man. (Always hated when that happened to me as a kid. It only looked so bad, because they were missing the context) She scolds her kid, and Foghorn too. She knows his tomfoolery won’t end well for him. He agrees, seeing as he is full of holes.

Favorite part: Foghorn first coming up to the kid and offering to play. He asks if it sounds fun. Egghead shakes his head without even looking at him. (Brother, can I relate)

At Your Service Madame

“Can’t you ever try and behave yourself like the others?”

Supervision by Isadore Freleng; Animation by Don Williams and Cal Dalton; Music by Norman Spencer. A Merrie Melody released on August 29, 1936.

You know, my grandparents once bought me a DVD set that was said to contain all of Porky’s cartoons. Looking at the cover, I could tell it wasn’t a licensed product. But hey, a gift is a gift and I DID want to see every Porky cartoon. Sadly, it was shoddily made. First off, it was clear that whoever made this, did so by just filming Cartoon Network. Therefore, some of the cartoons had jokes edited out, and ugly recolorings of black and white shorts. The idiot even left snippets of the episodes of Toonheads that were airing certain cartoons. Second, he didn’t include “Dime to Retire” (I only was able to notice this, because it was one I saw as a kid and was looking forward to seeing again) Lastly, (and the reason I’m bringing this story up at all) two of the cartoons didn’t star Porky at all. Instead, it was Piggy Hamhock.

Moral: Don’t lie to a Looney Tune fanatic. You’ll get caught.

Now then, on this day every year, we salute all mothers for what they do for us. However, sometimes, even they need a little help. Such is the case of Mrs. Hamhock, but I’m getting ahead of myself. Our story begins on a tranquil morning. The Hamhock matriarch calls her children to breakfast. One of whom, is Piggy. (This is before his more well known short, “Pigs is pigs.”) He pretty much behaves the same way we last saw him, but he wears pajamas this time around. (Ironically, his mom doesn’t wear anything under her apron. And that makes me uncomfortable)

Enter our villain of the short. Why, it’s W.C. Squeals! Making his first appearance as well! He’s a bum here, that gets his news by reading street newspapers. What a headline that captures his interest! Mrs. Hamhock is a widow with a fortune. (R.I.P. Mr. Hamhock, Piggy Sr.) Well, when you you live on the streets, and are a bachelor yourself (and your nostrils light up, and your snout changes color) wooing a lonely (rich) lady is the gentlemanly thing to do. Good thing he’s right outside their house.

The Mrs. (who, if my logic is correct, (and it always is) is named Fluffy) is happy to let some random person she doesn’t know, but knows who she is, into her house. She maybe well versed in manners, but it was her husband who had all the common sense. Squeals admires her home. To his credit, he doesn’t try to marry her on the spot or anything. Instead, his plan is to distract her while he robs the safe. Asking for a little piano music, he serenades her with the title song, using the noise to drown out his safe opening.

Piggy may be a piggy, but he isn’t one to let his mother be swindled. Squeals keeps pushing the kid away, so he has to get some help from his siblings. They are quite the team, and manage to not only rough Squeals up a bit, but eject all the money from his pockets as well. She is quite grateful and gives them all kisses. (Although she never thanks Piggy. This is why he had to steal her pies later on) Having been caught, Squeals has no other option but to be on his way. He acts rather calm though. Much like Nixon did, he leaves with dignity.

The Hamhocks themselves were planned to have a series of cartoons. Each of the children were going to have one where they showed an example of one  of the deadly sins. Only the gluttony one made it. With how deliciously (hee hee) creepy it was, I’m saddened to know there could have been more.

Favorite part*: When one of the piglet’s pajamas comes undone, another one helps put it back into place. Helps enforce the fact that they are family, and will jump in to help each other when needed.

*(An honorable mention goes to Piggy pretending to brush his teeth by wetting his toothbrush. A tactic I used to pull as well)

Weasel While you Work

“That boy’s as strong as an ox. And just about as smart.”

Directed by Robert McKimson; Story by Michael Maltese; Animation by Warren Batchelder, Tom Ray, George Grandpre, and Ted Bonnicksen; Layouts and Backgrounds by Robert Gribbroek; Film Editor: Treg Brown; Voice Characterization by Mel Blanc; Musical Direction by John Seely. A Merrie Melody released on August 6, 1958.

Ah, Winter. A beau… actually, it’s rather ugly. Everything is cold, wet and damp. A peace… actually, the stillness is so pronounced that it could lead to a nervous breakdown. A fu… ACTUALLY, it isn’t fun either! It just makes one tired, listless, and irritable. So why would Foghorn enjoy such a miserable season? Well, it does give him the opportunity to try out some different tricks on old Barnyard Dawg. (Rolling him up into a snowman to be precise.)

Their usual rivalry is cut short by a third party: a weasel. This guy has actually appeared in a  few of Foghorn’s shorts, with this one being his final appearance. He’s pretty much just Taz. Doesn’t say much, salivates at every moment, and desperate for food. Also, he’s tiny! Maybe it’s just how he looks when compared to the giant rooster that is Foghorn, but he looks severely malnourished. Which could also explain his never-ending hunger. (Makes him look less like a mustelid, and more like a shrew.)

Teeny weeny weasel begins gnawing on Foghorn’s leg, but he offers up something even better: venison! (But there’s no deer around. Just the dog… Ohhhhhhh.) Placing a small pair of antlers on the dog is enough to fool the creature, and he tries to feast once more. Dawg automatically knows who is to blame for this, and gets the weasel to change his mind on some chicken for dinner. The dog freezes Foggy in a block of ice and leaves him in the company of the weasel and his axe.

Foghorn escapes that somehow. (I guess it was too boring to waste time animating.) For his next move, he dresses up his adversary as a seal and has the weasel carry him off. (All this talk of gourmet meat is driving my stomach crazy! But with 200 lbs. and counting, I don’t think a snack is such a good idea.) When the dog breaks free, I guess that’s the deciding point, as once the weasel has Foghorn in a pot, he won’t be swayed by any more suggestions. Good thing Foghorn has a giant ice sculpture of himself on standby. (When did he carve that? I’m sure I know why.) Weasel takes the bait and starts eating. (Don’t worry, it’s low calorie.) Foghorn tries to pull one more over on the dog, but the hound foresaw this, and tied a fake tail to a firecracker. So it seems that chickens DO fly when it snows in July!

Favorite part: B.D.’s spelling lesson. R-A-T spells chicken.

 

Goo Goo Goliath

“He’s a heavy one, isn’t he?”

Directed by I. Freleng; Story by Warren Foster; Animation by Art Davis, Manuel Perez, Ken Champin, and Virgil Ross; Layouts by Hawley Pratt; Backgrounds by Irv Wyner; Musical Direction by Carl W. Stalling. A Merrie Melody released on September 18, 1954.

Time for another delivery, courtesy of the stork. (Did you think babies came from outer space? What idiot told you that?) The bird in charge of the latest baby doesn’t look like he’s the best candidate. Having recently finished one delivery, and given glasses of champagne for his troubles. Nonetheless, he takes his bundle and flies off. It’s a rather large baby, as he is intended for the giant couple who lives at the top of the beanstalk. The inebriated bird gives up by the time he reaches Greentown and opts to just drop the child off at the only pink house located for miles.

Luckily for everyone, the stork’s logic of “never seeing any couple not want a baby” pulls through and our couple (Ethel and John) happily take the kid in. (We’re never explicitly told whether or not they actually were supposed to have a kid) And the majority of this picture is showing the hi-jinks that ensue with a baby who is born large, and soon grows larger.  Bouncing him on your leg will break every bone in said leg, he feasts upon gallons of milk and when he moves on to solid food, it is delivered via cement mixer, and they sidestep any tasteless gags they COULD make by just showing a delivery of a diaper that needs two men to carry. Although I must admit, I’ve always wondered similar things about Clifford the dog. I can’t help it, I’m a zoologist! And going back to that last point, isn’t it a little TOO big? How much is needed? I’m no expert on kids!

Dᴀᴅ? I ᴛʜɪɴᴋ I’ᴍ sɪᴄᴋ.

Just wait it out. If you die, that means you were too weak to survive.

More gags follow. The baby (who does look cute, I’ll give him that. But I’m not naming him. That’s a job for his parents.) gets bathed in the pool, uses tires as teething rings, and can push his dad to work when the car doesn’t start. (I guess it just gets towed home each night?) But babies will be babies, and our outstanding parents leave the gate open one day, so he wanders off on his own. (At least they do have the sense to call the police.) It’s like “Honey, I blew up the kid.” (Going off on another unrelated tangent, that movie annoys me. The kid was a danger to countless people as well as himself! Why shouldn’t people be allowed to tranquilize him? Plus, shooting annoying children is always a plus in my book)

Tʜᴀᴛ ᴇxᴘʟᴀɪɴs ᴀ ʟᴏᴛ ᴀʙᴏᴜᴛ ʏᴏᴜ.

*gunshot*

Despite the fact it’s been several weeks if not months by now, the stork is just BARELY going after the kid. (And apparently is going to keep his job. I bet you could write a fascinating book about the stork’s labor union.) And I think they sneak in a subtle reference to why some people are infertile, as the stork says no more babies are to be delivered until this is fixed. He finds the kid asleep in the arms of lady liberty. Impressively, he manages to hoist the titanic toddler up to his real home. (Mr. Giant has been having to make do with a miniature baby. It’s like trying to raise a Lego figurine.) The stork then finishes up by giving the smaller baby to what his still tipsy body identifies as its new home: a kangaroo. (Despite how slimy it probably is in there, the baby seems happy. What a trooper!)

It’s Hummer Time

“I tawt I taw a putty-tat.”

Directed by Robert McKimson; Story by Warren Foster; Animation by Rod Scribner, J.C. Melendez, Charles McKimson, Phil DeLara, and John Carey; Layouts by Cornett Wood; Backgrounds by Richard H. Thomas; Effects Animation by Harry Love; Voice Characterization by Mel Blanc; Musical Direction by Carl W. Stalling. A Looney Tune released on July 22, 1950.

The plot for this picture: a cat trying to catch a hummingbird of all creatures. (It’s like chasing a chicken nugget. I want a short where a spider tries to catch one of these birds, as flies won’t cut it anymore.) The bird isn’t dumb enough to swim in the birdbath the cat is holding, and flies off after squirting him in the face. The cat (who can also be found in “A Fractured Leghorn” and “Early to Bet.”) gives chase, but ends up sinking his claws into a dog. Much like in the latter of the two shorts up there, the dog subjects the cat to various punishments. Only here, the cat doesn’t get any say in things. First up: being pulled through a hole in a fence.

As the cat hunts with net in hand, the bird flies close to the dogs head. With them both being on one side of a wall, the cat swings but gets the dog. Now he must attend a birthday party for himself. He doesn’t even have to share the cake! (The candles are explosives though) Next, he ties a flower onto a balloon and tries to fish for the bird. Said bird paints the cats face on it and brings it to the dog’s attention. When he pulls the string, the cat reels him in. This earns him a trip down a drain pipe.

Is this really worth all the trouble? Well, given a hummingbird’s diet, I suppose they are the cat equivalent of candy. (Like a flying Bit-O-Honey) So the cat chases the bird over near the dog’s house. There, he makes the mistake of laying a paw on the dog’s bones. That’s earned him a trip into a cement mixer. (Normally, that would be horrific way to go, but here it just freezes him in cement.)

Now really, in a universe where a dog can collect monetary rewards, why can’t the cat just go BUY something to eat? You know, that is an excellent question. So, the bird sticks one of his feathers into the dog’s mouth and so the cat has no other option but to take a peek inside and see if there is anything left. (He’s not dumb enough to open the mouth on his own. He uses sneeze powder. But really, why is he afraid of the dog? Notice how he phases out of existence when doing this.) The dog has had enough, and prepares to subject the cat to “the works.” Here, the cat has a rope tied around his tail, that will take him through the fence, through several other obstacles (including a drainpipe) and landing him in the cement mixer once more. Neither of them notice the bird who ties some extra rope to the dog’s leg and the cat’s body. Unaware, the dog ends up dragged into the machine with his victim. The bird then sets it to birdbath, and gets a nice new place to bathe.

 

Horton hatches the Egg

“I’m still on vacation.”

Supervised by Robert Clampett; Animation by Robert McKimson. A Merrie Melody released on April 11, 1942.

Yep! This short is the only Looney Tune that is adapting someone else’s property. Clampett’s wild animation style mixed with Seuss’s wild imagination? What a combination! Since you no doubt know the story, I’m just going to have Boy read it out loud, while I make comments about the story as well as changes in the short. Take it away!

Sɪɢʜᴇᴅ Mᴀʏᴢɪᴇ, ᴀ ʟᴀᴢʏ ʙɪʀᴅ ʜᴀᴛᴄʜɪɴɢ ᴀɴ ᴇɢɢ: “I’ᴍ ᴛɪʀᴇᴅ ᴀɴᴅ I’ᴍ ʙᴏʀᴇᴅ ᴀɴᴅ I’ᴠᴇ ᴋɪɴᴋs ɪɴ ᴍʏ ʟᴇɢ ꜰʀᴏᴍ sɪᴛᴛɪɴɢ, ᴊᴜsᴛ sɪᴛᴛɪɴɢ ʜᴇʀᴇ ᴅᴀʏ ᴀꜰᴛᴇʀ ᴅᴀʏ. Iᴛ’s ᴡᴏʀᴋ! Hᴏᴡ I ʜᴀᴛᴇ ɪᴛ! I’ᴅ ᴍᴜᴄʜ ʀᴀᴛʜᴇʀ ᴘʟᴀʏ! I’ᴅ ᴛᴀᴋᴇ ᴀ ᴠᴀᴄᴀᴛɪᴏɴ, ꜰʟʏ ᴏꜰꜰ ꜰᴏʀ ᴀ ʀᴇsᴛ ɪꜰ I ᴄᴏᴜʟᴅ ꜰɪɴᴅ sᴏᴍᴇᴏɴᴇ ᴛᴏ sᴛᴀʏ ᴏɴ ᴍʏ ɴᴇsᴛ! Iꜰ I ᴄᴏᴜʟᴅ ꜰɪɴᴅ sᴏᴍᴇᴏɴᴇ, I’ᴅ ꜰʟʏ ᴀᴡᴀʏ-ꜰʀᴇᴇ….”

The first difference is that Clampett added much more color. The book has much more black and white with a green sky. Speaking of the book, Clampett and his crew didn’t even use storyboards when making this short. They just scribbled notes in Clampett’s copy of the book. Perhaps their work on this is what inspired Seuss to help with Snafu?

But really, is Mayzie so lazy that sitting on her can, is too much work? I know one has to tip the egg constantly to keep it warm on all sides and keep the chick from sticking to one part of the egg, but is it really work?

Tʜᴇɴ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ, ᴛʜᴇ Eʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ, ᴘᴀssᴇᴅ ʙʏ ʜᴇʀ ᴛʀᴇᴇ.
“Hᴇʟʟᴏ!” ᴄᴀʟʟᴇᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ʟᴀᴢʏ ʙɪʀᴅ, sᴍɪʟɪɴɢ ʜᴇʀ ʙᴇsᴛ, “Yᴏᴜ’ᴠᴇ ɴᴏᴛʜɪɴɢ ᴛᴏ ᴅᴏ ᴀɴᴅ ɪ ᴅᴏ ɴᴇᴇᴅ ᴀ ʀᴇsᴛ. Wᴏᴜʟᴅ YOU ʟɪᴋᴇ ᴛᴏ sɪᴛ ᴏɴ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇɢɢ ɪɴ ᴍʏ ɴᴇsᴛ?”

In the short, Horton is pink. Because it’s Clampett, d*mn it! Nothing is too crazy for this man. And instead of Blanc, we have Kent Rogers who I’ve mentioned was also the voice for “The Bashful Buzzard,” Beaky. The somewhat slow and dopey voice suits Horton. It’s how I’ve always pictured him talking.

Tʜᴇ ᴇʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ ʟᴀᴜɢʜᴇᴅ. “Wʜʏ, ᴏꜰ ᴀʟʟ sɪʟʟʏ ᴛʜɪɴɢs! I ʜᴀᴠᴇɴ’ᴛ ꜰᴇᴀᴛʜᴇʀs ᴀɴᴅ I ʜᴀᴠᴇɴ’ᴛ ᴡɪɴɢs. ME ᴏɴ ʏᴏᴜʀ ᴇɢɢ? Wʜʏ, ᴛʜᴀᴛ ᴅᴏᴇsɴ’ᴛ ᴍᴀᴋᴇ sᴇɴsᴇ…. ʏᴏᴜʀ ᴇɢɢ ɪs sᴏ ᴍᴀʟʟ, ᴍᴀ’ᴀᴍ, ᴀɴᴅ I’ᴍ sᴏ ɪᴍᴍᴇɴsᴇ!”
“Tᴜᴛ, ᴛᴜᴛ,” ᴀɴsᴡᴇʀᴇᴅ Mᴀʏᴢɪᴇ. “I ᴋɴᴏᴡ ʏᴏᴜ’ʀᴇ ɴᴏᴛ sᴍᴀʟʟ ʙᴜᴛ I’ᴍ sᴜʀᴇ ʏᴏᴜ ᴄᴀɴ ᴅᴏ ɪᴛ. Nᴏ ᴛʀᴏᴜʙʟᴇ ᴀᴛ ᴀʟʟ. Jᴜsᴛ sɪᴛ ᴏɴ ɪᴛ sᴏꜰᴛʟʏ. Yᴏᴜ’ʀᴇ ɢᴇɴᴛʟᴇ ᴀɴᴅ ᴋɪɴᴅ. Cᴏᴍᴇ, ʙᴇ ᴀ ɢᴏᴏᴅ ꜰᴇʟʟᴏᴡ. I ᴋɴᴏᴡ ʏᴏᴜ ᴡᴏɴ’ᴛ ᴍɪɴᴅ.”
“I ᴄᴀɴ’ᴛ,” sᴀɪᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇʟᴇᴘᴀʜɴᴛ. “PL-E-E-ASE!” ʙᴇɢɢᴇᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ʙɪʀᴅ. “I ᴡᴏɴ’ᴛ ʙᴇ ɢᴏɴᴇ ʟᴏɴɢ, sɪʀ. I ɢɪᴠᴇ ʏᴏᴜ ᴍʏ ᴡᴏʀᴅ. I’ʟʟ ʜᴜʀʀʏ ʀɪɢʜᴛ ʙᴀᴄᴋ. Wʜʏ, I’ʟʟ ɴᴇᴠᴇʀ ʙᴇ ᴍɪssᴇᴅ….”

Horton takes a little more convincing in the book. Not much, but he doesn’t say he can’t in the short. And as for not having wings, I’m not sure that’s a valid argument. Ever look at the way Seuss draws elephant ears? They look an awful lot like what angels use to fly.

“Vᴇʀʏ ᴡᴇʟʟ,” sᴀɪᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ, “sɪɴᴄᴇ ʏᴏᴜ ɪɴsɪsᴛ….
Yᴏᴜ ᴡᴀɴᴛ ᴀ ᴠᴀᴄᴀᴛɪᴏɴ. Gᴏ ꜰʟʏ ᴏꜰꜰ ᴀɴᴅ ᴛᴀᴋᴇ ɪᴛ. I’ʟʟ sɪᴛ ᴏɴ ʏᴏᴜʀ ᴇɢɢ ᴀɴᴅ I’ʟʟ ᴛʀʏ ɴᴏᴛ ᴛᴏ ʙʀᴇᴀᴋ ɪᴛ. I’ʟʟ sᴛᴀʏ ᴀɴᴅ ʙᴇ ꜰᴀɪᴛʜꜰᴜʟ. I ᴍᴇᴀɴ ᴡʜᴀᴛ I sᴀʏ.”
“Tᴏᴏᴅʟᴇ-ᴏᴏ!” sᴀɴɢ ᴏᴜᴛ Mᴀʏᴢɪᴇ ᴀɴᴅ ꜰʟᴜᴛᴛᴇʀᴇᴅ ᴀᴡᴀʏ.

So who was the father of this egg? Many birds stay together to raise it, but the male must be worst than Mayzie. She at least bothered to make sure the egg wouldn’t die without her. Unless he was the better parent, and just happened to be eaten by the cat in the hat.

“H-ᴍ-ᴍ-ᴍ… ᴛʜᴇ ꜰɪʀsᴛ ᴛʜɪɴɢ ᴛᴏ ᴅᴏ,” ᴍᴜʀᴍᴜʀᴇᴅ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ, “Lᴇᴛ’s sᴇᴇ…. Tʜᴇ ꜰɪʀsᴛ ᴛʜɪɴɢ ᴛᴏ ᴅᴏ ɪs ᴛᴏ ᴘʀᴏᴘ ᴜᴘ ᴛʜɪs ᴛʀᴇᴇ ᴀɴᴅ ᴍᴀᴋᴇ ɪᴛ ᴍᴜᴄʜ sᴛʀᴏɴɢᴇʀ. Tʜᴀᴛ ʜᴀs ᴛᴏ ʙᴇ ᴅᴏɴᴇ ʙᴇꜰᴏʀᴇ I ɢᴇᴛ ᴏɴ ɪᴛ. I ᴍᴜsᴛ ᴡᴇɪɢʜ ᴀ ᴛᴏɴ.”

I like the fact that Seuss decided to explain how the tree won’t snap under an elephant’s weight, but not explaining how the elephant wasn’t crushing the egg? That wasn’t as important. This part gets no mention in the short. The tree just gets propped without explanation. And Horton only weighs about a ton? How old is he? Judging by the lack of tusks, he must be pretty young, but I always figured he was full grown. If he is, he is way malnourished!

Tʜᴇɴ ᴄᴀʀᴇꜰᴜʟʟʏ, ᴛᴇɴᴅᴇʀʟʏ, ɢᴇɴᴛʟʏ ʜᴇ ᴄʀᴇᴘᴛ ᴜᴘ ᴛʜᴇ ᴛʀᴜɴᴋ ᴛᴏ ᴛʜᴇ ɴᴇsᴛ ᴡʜᴇʀᴇ ᴛʜᴇ ʟɪᴛᴛʟᴇ ᴇɢɢ sʟᴇᴘᴛ.

As far as I know, unhatched chicks don’t wake in their eggs. So, yes. Slept is the right term.

Tʜᴇɴ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇʟᴘʜᴀɴᴛ sᴍɪʟᴇᴅ. “Nᴏᴡ ᴛʜᴀᴛ’s ᴛʜᴀᴛ….”
Aɴᴅ ʜᴇ sᴀᴛ ᴀɴᴅ ʜᴇ sᴀᴛ ᴀɴᴅ ʜᴇ sᴀᴛ ᴀɴᴅ ʜᴇ sᴀᴛ….

And what did he do for food? Did he just eat all the plants surrounding him? And what about defecation? Did he ever stop sitting so he wouldn’t soil the egg? These are the kind of questions I ponder.

Aɴᴅ ʜᴇ sᴀᴛ ᴀʟʟ ᴛʜᴀᴛ ᴅᴀʏ ᴀɴᴅ ʜᴇ ᴋᴇᴘᴛ ʜᴇ ᴇɢɢ ᴡᴀʀᴍ…. Aɴᴅ ʜᴇ sᴀᴛ ᴀʟʟ ᴛʜᴀᴛ ɴɪɢʜᴛ ᴛʜʀᴏᴜɢʜ ᴀ ᴛᴇʀʀɪʙʟᴇ sᴛᴏʀᴍ. Iᴛ ᴘᴏᴜʀᴇᴅ ᴀɴᴅ ɪᴛ ʟɪɢʜɴɪɴɢᴇᴅ! Iᴛ ᴛʜᴜɴᴅᴇʀᴇᴅ! Iᴛ ʀᴜᴍʙʟᴇᴅ! “Tʜɪs ɪsɴ’ᴛ ᴍᴜᴄʜ ꜰᴜɴ,” ᴛʜᴇ ᴘᴏᴏʀ ᴇʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ ɢʀᴜᴍʙʟᴇᴅ. “I ᴡɪsʜ sʜᴇ’ᴅ ᴄᴏᴍᴇ ʙᴀᴄᴋ ‘ᴄᴀᴜsᴇ I’ᴍ ᴄᴏʟᴅ ᴀɴᴅ I’ᴍ ᴡᴇᴛ. I ʜᴏᴘᴇ ᴛʜᴀᴛ ᴛʜᴀᴛ Mᴀʏᴢɪᴇ ʙɪʀᴅ ᴅᴏᴇsɴ’ᴛ ꜰᴏʀɢᴇᴛ.”

I understand you’re upset Horton, but wouldn’t you be wet no matter where you went? You’re not exactly small enough to hide under much. And are you really that cold? I figured you were in a jungle of some sort. The short has some fun with this scene. The whole place floods and only the tip of his trunk shows. (The egg is doing fine while submerged.)

Bᴜᴛ Mᴀʏᴢɪᴇ, ʙʏ ᴛʜɪs ᴛɪᴍᴇ, ᴡᴀs ꜰᴀʀ ʙᴇʏᴏɴᴅ ʀᴇᴀᴄʜ, ᴇɴᴊᴏʏɪɴɢ ᴛʜᴇ sᴜɴsʜɪɴᴇ ᴡᴀʏ ᴏꜰꜰ ɪɴ Pᴀʟᴍ Bᴇᴀᴄʜ, ᴀɴᴅ ʜᴀᴠɪɴɢ sᴜᴄʜ ꜰᴜɴ, sᴜᴄʜ ᴀ ᴡᴏɴᴅᴇʀꜰᴜʟ ʀᴇsᴛ, ᴅᴇᴄɪᴅᴇᴅ sʜᴇ’ᴅ NEVER ɢᴏ ʙᴀᴄᴋ ᴛᴏ ʜᴇʀ ɴᴇsᴛ!

“Far beyond reach?” How fast was she flying? She only left earlier in the day. And for those of you who have the book, look at this page. Why is that one guy staring at her? Has he never seen a bird before? Or is he like me and just amazed to see such an animal out of its natural habitat?

Sᴏ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴋᴇᴘᴛ sɪᴛᴛɪɴɢ ᴛʜᴇʀᴇ, ᴅᴀʏ ᴀꜰᴛᴇʀ ᴅᴀʏ. Aɴᴅ sᴏᴏɴ ɪᴛ ᴡᴀs Aᴜᴛᴜᴍɴ. Tʜᴇ ʟᴇᴀᴠᴇs ʙʟᴇᴡ ᴀᴡᴀʏ. Aɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇɴ ᴄᴀᴍᴇ ᴛʜᴇ Wɪɴᴛᴇʀ… ᴛʜᴇ sɴᴏᴡ ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇ sʟᴇᴇᴛ! Aɴᴅ ɪᴄɪᴄʟᴇs ʜᴜɴɢ ꜰʀᴏᴍ ʜɪs ᴛʀᴜɴᴋ ᴀɴᴅ ʜɪs ꜰᴇᴇᴛ.
Bᴜᴛ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴋᴇᴘᴛ sɪᴛᴛɪɴɢ, ᴀɴᴅ sᴀɪᴅ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴀ sɴᴇᴇᴢᴇ, “I’ʟʟ sᴛᴀʏ ᴏɴ ᴛʜɪs ᴇɢɢ ᴀɴᴅ I ᴡᴏɴ’ᴛ ʟᴇᴛ ɪᴛ ꜰʀᴇᴇᴢᴇ. I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ ᴡʜᴀᴛ I sᴀɪᴅ ᴀɴᴅ I sᴀɪᴅ ᴡʜᴀᴛ I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ…. Aɴ ᴇʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ’s ꜰᴀɪᴛʜꜰᴜʟ ᴏɴᴇ ʜᴜɴᴅʀᴇᴅ ᴘᴇʀ ᴄᴇɴᴛ!”

Okay, I guess it wasn’t a jungle then. In the short, Horton at least gets a cute pair of earmuffs for this part. As for the book, the tree has switched sides and now leans to the left.

Sᴏ ᴘᴏᴏʀ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ sᴀᴛ ᴛʜᴇʀᴇ ᴛʜᴇ ᴡʜᴏʟᴇ ᴡɪɴᴛᴇʀ ᴛʜʀᴏᴜɢʜ…. Aɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇɴ ᴄᴀᴍᴇ ᴛʜᴇ sᴘʀɪɴɢᴛɪᴍᴇ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴛʀᴏᴜʙʟᴇs ᴀɴᴇᴡ! Hɪs ꜰʀɪᴇɴᴅs ɢᴀᴛʜᴇʀᴇᴅ ʀᴏᴜɴᴅ ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇʏ sʜᴏᴜʀᴛᴇᴅ ᴡɪᴛʜ ɢʟᴇᴇ.

One of these friends may look familiar. It’s Rosebud the mouse, who we last saw in “Farm Frolics”. Making his only other appearance here. Another of his friends is a kangaroo who has joey that has another joey in its pouch. Strange.

“Lᴏᴏᴋ! Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴛʜᴇ Eʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ’s ᴜᴘ ɪɴ ᴀ ᴛʀᴇᴇ!” Tʜᴇʏ ᴛᴀᴜɴᴛᴇᴅ. Tʜᴇʏ ᴛᴇᴀsᴇᴅ ʜɪᴍ. Tʜᴇʏ ʏᴇʟʟᴇᴅ, “Hᴏᴡ ᴀʙsᴜʀᴅ!” “Oʟᴅ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴛʜᴇ Eʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ ᴛʜɪɴᴋs ʜᴇ’s ᴀ ʙɪʀᴅ!”

And I guess they didn’t give him a chance to explain himself. Maybe once they learned of his predicament, they’d help out. At least try and find Mayzie.

Tʜᴇʏ ʟᴀᴜɢʜᴇᴅ ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇʏ ʟᴀᴜɢʜᴇᴅ. Tʜᴇɴ ᴛʜᴇʏ ᴀʟʟ ʀᴀɴ ᴀᴡᴀʏ. Aɴᴅ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴡᴀs ʟᴏɴᴇʟʏ. Hᴇ ᴡᴀɴᴛᴇᴅ ᴛᴏ ᴘʟᴀʏ. Bᴜᴛ ʜᴇ sᴀᴛ ᴏɴ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇɢɢ ᴀɴᴅ ᴄᴏɴᴛɪɴᴜᴇᴅ ᴛᴏ sᴀʏ: “I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ ᴡʜᴀᴛ I sᴀɪᴅ ᴀɴᴅ I sᴀɪᴅ ᴡᴀʜᴛ I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ…. Aɴᴅ ᴇʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ’s ꜰᴀɪᴛʜꜰᴜʟ ᴏɴᴇ ʜᴜɴᴅʀᴇᴅ ᴘᴇʀ ᴄᴇɴᴛ!

I suppose it isn’t really specified, but it sounds like Horton wants to play with these animals who are dicks. Surely you can make some better friends, man.

“Nᴏ ᴍᴀᴛᴛᴇʀ WHAT ʜᴀᴘᴘᴇɴs, ᴛʜɪs ᴇɢɢ ᴍᴜsᴛ ʙᴇ ᴛᴇɴᴅᴇᴅ!” Bᴜᴛ ᴘᴏᴏʀ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ’s ᴛʀᴏᴜʙʟᴇs ᴡᴇʀᴇ ꜰᴀʀ, ꜰᴀʀ ꜰʀᴏᴍ ᴇɴᴅᴇᴅ. Fᴏʀ, ᴡʜɪʟᴇ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ sᴀᴛ ᴛʜᴇʀᴇ sᴏ ꜰᴀɪᴛʜꜰᴜʟ, sᴏ ᴋɪɴᴅ, ᴛʜʀᴇᴇ ʜᴜɴᴛᴇʀs ᴄᴀᴍᴇ sɴᴇᴀᴋɪɴɢ ᴜᴘ sᴏꜰᴛʟʏ ʙᴇʜɪɴᴅ!

Clampett has fun with the hunters designs. Each one looks different than the others.

Hᴇ ʜᴇᴀʀᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ᴍᴇɴ’s ꜰᴏᴏᴛsᴛᴇᴘs! Hᴇ ᴛᴜʀɴᴇᴅ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴀ sᴛᴀʀᴛ! Tʜʀᴇᴇ ʀɪꜰʟᴇs ᴡᴇʀᴇ ᴀɪᴍɪɴɢ ʀɪɢʜᴛ sᴛʀᴀɪɢʜᴛ ᴀᴛ ʜɪs ʜᴇᴀʀᴛ!

And in the animated world, heart apparently means rump.

Dɪᴅ ʜᴇ ʀᴜɴ? Hᴇ ᴅɪᴅ ɴᴏᴛ! HORTON STAYED ON THAT NEST! Hᴇ ʜᴇʟᴅ ʜɪs ʜᴇᴀᴅ ʜɪɢʜ ᴀɴᴅ ʜᴇ ᴛʜʀᴇᴡ ᴏᴜᴛ ʜɪs ᴄʜᴇsᴛ ᴀɴᴅ ʜᴇ ʟᴏᴏᴋᴇᴅ ᴀᴛ ᴛʜᴇ ʜᴜɴᴛᴇʀs ᴀs ᴍᴜᴄʜ ᴀs ᴛᴏ sᴀʏ: “Sʜᴏᴏᴛ ɪꜰ ʏᴏᴜ ᴍᴜsᴛ ʙᴜᴛ I ᴡᴏɴ’ᴛ ʀᴜɴ ᴀᴡᴀʏ! I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ ᴡʜᴀᴛ Isᴀɪᴅ ᴀɴᴅ I sᴀɪᴅ ᴡʜᴀᴛ I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ…. Aɴᴅ ᴇʟᴇᴘᴀɴᴛs’s ꜰᴀɪᴛʜꜰᴜʟ ᴏɴᴇ ʜᴜɴᴅʀᴇᴅ ᴘᴇʀ ᴄᴇɴᴛ!”

Horton is so bass.

Bᴜᴛ ᴛʜᴇ ᴍᴇɴ ᴅɪᴅɴ’ᴛ sʜᴏᴏᴛ! Mᴜᴄʜ ᴛᴏ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ’s sᴜʀᴘʀɪsᴇ, ᴛʜᴇʏ ᴅʀᴏᴘᴘᴇᴅ ᴛʜᴇɪʀ ᴛʜʀᴇᴇ ɢᴜɴs ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇʏ sᴛᴀʀᴇᴅ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴡɪᴅᴇ ᴇʏᴇs! “ʟᴏᴏᴋ!” ᴛʜᴇʏ ᴀʟʟ sʜᴏᴜᴛᴇᴅ, “Cᴀɴ sᴜᴄʜ ᴀ ᴛʜɪɴɢ ʙᴇ? Aɴ ᴇʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ sɪᴛɪɴɢ ᴏɴ ᴛᴏᴘ ᴏꜰ ᴀ ᴛʀᴇᴇ…”

Really, it’s only mildly interesting. The tree that isn’t breaking, THAT’S the impressive part.

“Iᴛ’s sᴛʀᴀɴɢᴇ! Iᴛ’s ᴀᴍᴀᴢɪɴɢ! Iᴛ’s ᴡᴏɴᴅᴇʀꜰᴜʟ! Nᴇᴡ! Dᴏɴ’ᴛ sʜᴏᴏᴛ ʜɪᴍ. Wᴇ’ʟʟ CATCH ʜɪᴍ. Tʜᴀᴛ’s ᴊᴜsᴛ ᴡʜᴀᴛ ᴡᴇ’ʟʟ ᴅᴏ! Lᴇᴛ’s ᴛᴀᴋᴇ ʜɪᴍ ᴀʟɪᴠᴇ. Wʜʏ, ʜᴇ’s ᴛᴇʀʀɪʙʟʏ ꜰᴜɴɴʏ! Wᴇ’ʟʟ sᴇʟʟ ʜɪᴍ ʙᴀᴄᴋ ʜᴏᴍᴇ ᴛᴏ ᴀ ᴄɪʀᴄᴜs, ꜰᴏʀ ᴍᴏɴᴇʏ!”

I suppose during the war, even mildly funny was much appreciated.

Aɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ꜰɪʀsᴛ ᴛʜɪɴɢ ʜᴇ ᴋɴᴇᴡ, ᴛʜᴇʏ ʜᴀᴅ ʙᴜʟᴛ ᴀ ʙɪɢ ᴡᴀɢᴏɴ ᴡɪᴛʜ ʀᴏᴘᴇs ᴏɴ ᴛʜᴇ ꜰʀᴏɴᴛ ꜰᴏʀ ᴛᴏ ᴘᴜʟʟᴇʀs ᴛᴏ ᴅʀᴀɢ ᴏɴ. Tʜᴇʏ ᴅᴜɢ ᴜᴘ ʜɪs ᴛʀᴇᴇ ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇʏ ᴘᴜᴛ ɪᴛ ɪɴsɪᴅᴇ, ᴡɪᴛʜ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ sᴏ sᴀᴅ ᴛʜᴀᴛ ʜᴇ ᴘʀᴀᴄᴛɪᴄᴀʟʟʏ ᴄʀɪᴇᴅ. “Wᴇ’ʀᴇ ᴏꜰꜰ!” ᴛʜᴇ ᴍᴇɴ sʜᴏᴜᴛᴇᴅ. Aɴᴅ ᴏꜰꜰ ᴛʜᴇʏ ᴀʟʟ ᴡᴇɴᴛ ᴡɪᴛʜ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴜɴʜᴀᴘᴘʏ, ᴏɴᴇ ʜᴜɴᴅʀᴇᴅ ᴘᴇʀ ᴄᴇɴᴛ.

Somehow they did all this without Horton snapping their spines with his trunk, and they potted the tree. I suppose if they can pull the whole thing, lifting it was just a bit harder. Another minor difference in the short: all three pull.

Uᴘ ᴏᴜᴛ ᴏꜰ ᴛʜᴇ ᴊᴜɴɢʟᴇ! Uᴘ ɪɴᴛᴏ ᴛʜᴇ sᴋʏ! Uᴘ ᴏᴠᴇʀ ᴛʜᴇ ᴍᴏᴜɴᴛᴀɪɴs ᴛᴇɴ ᴛʜᴏᴜsᴀɴᴅ ꜰᴇᴇᴛ ʜɪɢʜ! Tʜᴇɴ ᴅᴏᴡɴ, ᴅᴏᴡɴ ᴛʜᴇ ᴍᴏᴜɴᴛᴀɪɴs ᴀɴᴅ ᴅᴏᴡɴ ᴛᴏ ᴛʜᴇ sᴇᴀ ᴡᴇɴᴛ ᴛʜᴇ ᴄᴀʀᴛ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ, ᴇɢɢ, ɴᴇsᴛ ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʀᴇᴇ …

So they WERE in a jungle! A jungle with snow. (And I though Wackyland was weird.) And did they really have to go up the mountain rather than around? These guys really must be the strongest men in the world. (I guess they are all named Artie.)

Tʜᴇɴ ᴏᴜᴛ ᴏꜰ ᴛʜᴇ ᴡᴀɢᴏɴ ᴀɴᴅ ᴏɴᴛᴏ ᴀ sʜɪᴘ! Oᴜᴛ ᴏᴠᴇʀ ᴛʜᴇ ᴏᴄᴇᴀɴ… ᴀɴᴅ ᴏᴏᴏʜ, ᴡʜᴀᴛ ᴀ ᴛʀɪᴘ! Rᴏʟʟɪɴɢ ᴀɴᴅ ᴛᴏssɪɴɢ ᴀɴᴅ sᴘʟᴀsʜᴇᴅ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴛʜᴇ sᴘʀᴀʏ! Aɴᴅ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ sᴀɪᴅ, ᴅᴀʏ ᴀꜰᴛᴇʀ ᴅᴀʏ ᴀꜰᴛᴇʀ ᴅᴀʏ, “I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ ᴡʜᴀᴛ I sᴀɪᴅ ᴀɴᴅ I sᴀɪᴅ ᴡʜᴀᴛ I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ… ʙᴜᴛ ᴏʜ, ᴀᴍ I sᴇᴀsɪᴄᴋ! Oɴᴇ ʜᴜɴᴅʀᴇᴅ ᴘᴇʀ ᴄᴇɴᴛ!”

Clampett had real fun with this page! See that fish watching the ship? He shoots himself now that he’s seen everything. And yes, suicidal fish get cut when aired on TV. Pussies.

Aꜰᴛᴇʀ ʙᴏʙʙɪɴɢ ᴀʀᴏᴜɴᴅ ꜰᴏʀ ᴛᴡᴏ ᴡᴇᴇᴋs ʟɪᴋᴇ ᴀ ᴄᴏʀᴋ, ᴛʜᴇ ʟᴀɴᴅᴇᴅ ᴀᴛ ʟᴀsᴛ ɪɴ ᴛʜᴇ ᴛᴏᴡɴ ᴏꜰ Nᴇᴡ Yᴏʀᴋ. “Aʟʟ ᴀsʜᴏʀᴇ!” ᴛʜᴇ ᴍᴇɴ sʜᴏᴜᴛᴇᴅ, ᴀɴᴅ ᴅᴏᴡɴ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴀ ʟᴜʀᴄʜ ᴡᴇɴᴛ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴛʜᴇ Eʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ sᴛɪʟʟ ᴏɴ ʜɪs ᴘᴇʀᴄʜ, ᴛɪᴇᴅ ᴏɴᴛᴏ ᴀ ʙᴏᴀʀᴅ ᴛʜᴀᴛ ᴄᴏᴜʟᴅ ᴊᴜsᴛ sᴄᴀʀᴇᴄʟʏ ʜᴏʟᴅ ʜɪᴍ….BUMP! Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ʟᴀɴᴅᴇᴅ! Aɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇɴ ᴛʜᴇ ᴍᴇɴ sᴏʟᴅ ʜɪᴍ!

I suppose he can’t talk to people in the book, but he can in the short. That just makes the people even more cruel.

Sᴏʟᴅ ᴛᴏ ᴀ ᴄɪʀᴄᴜs! Tʜᴇɴ ᴡᴇᴇᴋ ᴀꜰᴛᴇʀ ᴡᴇᴇᴋ ᴛʜᴇʏ sʜᴏᴡᴇᴅ ʜɪᴍ ᴛᴏ ᴘᴇᴏᴘʟᴇ ᴀᴛ ᴛᴇɴ ᴄᴇɴᴛs ᴀ ᴘᴇᴇᴋ. Tʜᴇʏ ᴛᴏᴏᴋ ʜɪᴍ ᴛᴏ Bᴏsᴛᴏɴ, ᴛᴏ Kᴀʟᴀᴍᴀᴢᴏᴏ, Cʜɪᴄᴀɢᴏ, Wᴇᴇʜᴀᴡᴋᴇɴ ᴀɴᴅ Wᴀsʜɪɴɢᴛᴏɴ, ᴛᴏᴏ! Tᴏ Dᴀʏᴛᴏɴ, Oʜɪᴏ; Sᴛ. Pᴀᴜʟ, Mɪɴɴᴇsᴏᴛᴀ; Tᴏ Wɪᴄʜɪᴛᴀ, Kᴀɴsᴀs; ᴛᴏ Dʀᴀᴋᴇ, Nᴏʀᴛʜ Dᴀᴋᴏᴛᴀ. Aɴᴅ ᴇᴠᴇʀʏᴡʜᴇʀᴇ ᴛʜᴏᴜsᴀɴᴅs ᴏꜰ ꜰᴏʟᴋs ꜰʟᴏᴄᴋᴇᴅ ᴛᴏ sᴇᴇ ᴀɴᴅ ʟᴀᴜɢʜ ᴀᴛ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ ᴜᴘ ɪɴ ᴀ ᴛʀᴇᴇ. Pᴏᴏʀ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ɢʀᴇᴡ sᴀᴅᴅᴇʀ ᴛʜᴇ ꜰᴀʀᴛʜᴇʀ ʜᴇ ᴡᴇɴᴛ, ʙᴜᴛ ʜᴇ sᴀɪᴅ ᴀs ʜᴇ sᴀᴛ ɪɴ ᴛʜᴇ ʜᴏᴛ ɴᴏɪsʏ ᴛᴇɴᴛ: “I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ ᴡʜᴀᴛ I sᴀɪᴅ, ᴀɴᴅ I sᴀɪᴅ ᴡʜᴀᴛ I ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ… ᴀɴ ᴇʟᴘʜᴀɴᴛ’s ꜰᴀɪᴛʜꜰᴜʟ-ᴏɴᴇ ʜᴜɴᴅʀᴇᴅ ᴘᴇʀ ᴄᴇɴᴛ!”

The crow isn’t animated in the short. They move as much as the people in the book do.

Tʜᴇɴ… ONE DAY ᴛʜᴇ Cɪʀᴄᴜs Sʜᴏᴡ ʜᴀᴘᴘᴇɴᴇᴅ ᴛᴏ ʀᴇᴀᴄʜ ᴀ ᴛᴏᴡɴ ᴡᴀʏ ᴅᴏᴡɴ sᴏᴜᴛʜ, ɴᴏᴛ sᴏ ꜰᴀʀ ꜰʀᴏᴍ Pᴀʟᴍ Bᴇᴀᴄʜ. Aɴᴅ, ᴅᴀᴡᴅʟɪɴɢ ᴀʟᴏɴɢ ᴡᴀʏ ᴜᴘ ʜɪɢʜ ɪɴ ᴛʜᴇ sᴋʏ, ᴡʜᴏ (ᴏꜰ ᴀʟʟ ᴘᴇᴏᴘʟᴇ!) sʜᴏᴜʟᴅ ᴄʜᴀɴᴄᴇ ᴛᴏ ꜰʟʏ ʙʏ ʙᴜᴛ ᴛʜᴀᴛ ᴏʟᴅ ɢᴏᴏᴅ-ꜰᴏʀ-ɴᴏᴛʜɪɴɢ ʙɪʀᴅ, ʀᴜɴᴀᴡᴀʏ Mᴀʏᴢɪᴇ! Sᴛɪʟʟ ᴏɴ ᴠᴀᴄᴀᴛɪᴏɴ ᴀɴᴅ sᴛɪʟʟ ᴊᴜsᴛ ᴀs ʟᴀᴢʏ. Aɴᴅ, sᴘʏɪɴɢ ᴛʜᴇ ꜰʟᴀɢs ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ᴛᴇɴᴛs ᴊᴜsᴛ ʙᴇʟᴏᴡ, sʜᴇ sᴀɴɢ ᴏᴜᴛ, “ᴡʜᴀᴛ ꜰᴜɴ! Wʜʏ, I’ʟʟ ɢᴏ ᴛᴏ ᴛʜᴇ sʜᴏᴡ!”

Birds are so proud of the fact admission doesn’t apply to them.

Aɴᴅ sʜᴇ sᴡᴏᴏᴘᴇᴅ ꜰʀᴏᴍ ᴛʜᴇ ᴄʟᴏᴜᴅs ᴛʜʀᴏᴜɢʜ ᴀɴ ᴏᴘᴇɴ ᴛᴇɴᴛ ᴅᴏᴏʀ… “Gᴏᴏᴅ ɢʀᴀᴄɪᴏᴜs!” ɢᴀsᴘᴇᴅ Mᴀʏᴢɪᴇ, “I’ᴠᴇ sᴇᴇɴ YOU ʙᴇꜰᴏʀᴇ!”
Pᴏᴏʀ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ʟᴏᴏᴋᴇᴅ ᴜᴘ ᴡɪᴛʜ ʜɪs ꜰᴀᴄᴇ ᴡʜɪᴛᴇ ᴀs ᴄʜᴀʟᴋ! Hᴇ sᴛᴀʀᴛᴇᴅ ᴛᴏ sᴘᴇᴀᴋ, ʙᴜᴛ ʙᴇꜰᴏʀᴇ ʜᴇ ᴄᴏᴜʟᴅ ᴛᴀʟᴋ…

I doubt she would have recognized him if he wasn’t in a tree.

Tʜᴇʀᴇ ʀᴀɴɢ ᴏᴜᴛ ᴛʜᴇ ɴᴏsɪᴇsᴛ ᴇᴀʀ-sᴘʟɪᴛᴛɪɴɢ sǫᴜᴇᴀᴋs ꜰʀᴏᴍ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇɢɢ ᴛʜᴀᴛ ʜᴇ’ᴅ sᴀᴛ ᴏɴ ꜰᴏʀ ꜰɪꜰᴛʏ-ᴏɴᴇ ᴡᴇᴇᴋs! A ᴛʜᴜᴍᴘɪɴɢ! ᴀ ʙᴜᴍᴘɪɴɢ! A ᴡɪʟᴅ ᴀʟɪᴠᴇ sᴄʀᴀᴛᴄʜɪɴɢ! “Mʏ ᴇɢɢ” sʜᴏᴜᴛᴇᴅ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ. “Mʏ EGG! WHY, IT’S HATCHING!”

You might think fifty-one weeks is too long for an egg to hatch, but an elephant’s gestation period is 22 months, so that sounds like a fair compromise.

“Bᴜᴛ ɪᴛ’s MINE!” sᴄʀᴇᴀᴍᴇᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ʙɪʀᴅ, ᴡʜᴇɴ sʜᴇ ʜᴀʀᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇɢɢ ᴄʀᴀᴄᴋ. (Tʜᴇ ᴡᴏʀᴋ ᴡᴀs ᴀʟʟ ᴅᴏɴᴇ. Nᴏᴡ sʜᴇ ᴀɴᴛᴇᴅ ɪᴛ ʙᴀᴄᴋ.) “Iᴛ’s MY ᴇɢɢ!” sʜᴇ sᴘᴜᴛᴛᴇʀᴇᴅ. “ʏᴏᴜ sᴛᴏʟᴇ ɪᴛ ꜰʀᴏᴍ ᴍᴇ! Gᴇᴛ ᴏꜰꜰ ᴏꜰ ᴍʏ ɴᴇsᴛ ᴀɴᴅ ɢᴇᴛ ᴏᴜᴛ ᴏꜰ ᴍʏ ᴛʀᴇᴇ!”
Pᴏᴏʀ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ʙᴀᴄᴋᴇᴅ ᴅᴏᴡɴ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴀ sᴀᴅ, ʜᴇᴀᴠʏ ʜᴇᴀʀᴛ….

Even as a kid this part bothered me. The work is NOT almost done, it’s only going to get harder. Why does she want it back so much? Does she think she can make the chick wait on her?

Bᴜᴛ ᴀᴛ ᴛʜᴀᴛ ᴠᴇʀʏ ɪɴsᴛᴀɴᴛ, ᴛʜᴇ ᴇɢɢ ʙᴜʀsᴛ ᴀᴘᴀʀᴛ! Aɴᴅ ᴏᴜᴛ ᴏꜰ ᴛʜᴇ ᴘɪᴇᴄᴇs ᴏꜰ ʀᴇᴅ ᴀɴᴅ ᴡʜɪᴛᴇ sʜᴇʟʟ, ꜰʀᴏᴍ ᴛʜᴇ ᴇɢɢ ᴛʜᴀᴛ ʜᴇ’ᴅ sᴀᴛ ᴏɴ sᴏ ʟᴏɴɢ ᴀɴᴅ sᴏ ᴡᴇʟʟ, Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴛʜᴇ Eʟᴇᴘʜᴀɴᴛ sᴀᴡ sᴏᴍᴇʜᴛɪɴɢ ᴡʜɪᴢᴢ! IT HAD EARS AND A TAIL AND A TRUNK JUST LIKE HIS!

So, unless sitting on an egg just infuses it with your D.N.A., Horton was the father all along. No wonder Mayzie made him sit. He had to do his share.

Aɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇ ᴘᴇᴏᴘʟᴇ ᴄᴀᴍᴇ sʜᴏᴜᴛɪɴɢ, “ᴡʜᴀᴛ’s ᴀʟʟ ᴛʜɪs ᴀʙᴏᴜᴛ…?” Tʜᴇʏ ʟᴏᴏᴋᴇᴅ! ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇʏ sᴛᴀʀᴇᴅ ᴡɪᴛʜ ᴛʜᴇɪʀ ᴇʏᴇs ᴘᴏᴘᴘɪɴɢ ᴏᴜᴛ~ Tʜᴇɴ ᴛʜᴇʏ ᴄʜᴇᴇʀᴇᴅ ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇʏ ᴄʜᴇᴇʀᴇᴅ ᴀɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇʏ CHEERED ᴍᴏʀᴇ ᴀɴᴅ ᴍᴏʀᴇ. Tʜᴇʏ’ᴅ ɴᴇᴠᴇʀ sᴇᴇɴ ᴀɴʏᴛʜɪɴɢ ʟɪᴋᴇ ɪᴛ ʙᴇꜰᴏʀᴇ! “Mʏ ɢᴏᴏᴅɴᴇss! Mʏ ɢʀᴀᴄɪᴏᴜs!” ᴛʜᴇʏ sʜᴏᴜᴛᴇᴅ. “MY WORD! Iᴛ’s sᴏᴍᴇᴛʜɪɴɢ ʙʀᴀɴᴅ ɴᴇᴡ! IT’S AN ELEPHANT BIRD!!
ᴀɴᴅ ɪᴛ sʜᴏᴜʟᴅ ʙᴇ, ɪᴛ sʜᴏᴜʟᴅ ʙᴇ, ɪᴛ SHOULD ʙᴇ ʟɪᴋᴇ ᴛʜᴀᴛ! Bᴇᴄᴀᴜsᴇ Hᴏʀᴛᴏɴ ᴡᴀs ꜰᴀɪᴛʜꜰᴜʟ! Hᴇ sᴀᴛ ᴀɴᴅ ʜᴇ sᴀᴛ! Hᴇ ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ ᴡʜᴀᴛ ʜᴇ sᴀɪᴅ ᴀɴᴅ ʜᴇ sᴀɪᴅ ᴡʜᴀᴛ ʜᴇ ᴍᴇᴀɴᴛ….”

Except… the elephant bird wasn’t brand new by 1940 when this book came out. It was a real species that had already gone extinct. It layed the biggest eggs of any animal. (And we’ve got another person staring at the bird again. Is he wondering what other chimaeras he could make?)

…Aɴᴅ ᴛʜᴇʏ sᴇɴᴛ ʜɪᴍ ʜᴏᴍᴇ ʜᴀᴘᴘʏ, ᴏɴᴇ ʜᴜɴᴅʀᴇᴅ ᴘᴇʀ ᴄᴇɴᴛ!

Showing that some people are nice after all. (But did they really never try and see if the elephant was sitting on anything?) I’m just glad it ended happily for everyone who wasn’t a prick. And our short ends with Horton and his (I’m guessing son.) singing together. And what a merry melody it is!

A Cartoonist’s Nightmare

♫The tables are turned, and now you’re in, our clutches!♫

Supervision by Jack King; Animation by Don Williams and Paul Smith; Musical Score by Bernard Brown. A Looney Tune released on September 21, 1935.

Before we move on to today’s short, it’s time for another rendition of “Something that actually happened to me, that I didn’t make up and is still related to our source material.” I was at work, and a little boy saw my Marvin the Martian shirt. Somehow, he knew that I was someone who actually watches the source material of what he wears, and not only complimented my attire, but asked what Looney Tunes DVDs I had. He had several of the same ones and I sent him away with some ideas about what others he should get. I’m just glad that SOME parents are making sure their kids watch true art. Wouldn’t be great to have a little pal to watch cartoons with?

Yᴇᴀʜ! Tʜᴇɴ I ᴄᴏᴜʟᴅ ʜᴀᴠᴇ sᴏᴍᴇᴏɴᴇ ᴛᴏ ᴘʟᴀʏ ᴡɪᴛʜ!

Too bad that will never happen. Now leave! The adults are talking.

Today’s short is a creepy good time! Definitely one of the more underrated shorts. It begins at Animated Cartoon Studio. (A subsidiary of Generic Products United.) Another day of work is done, and everyone goes home. (Keep your eyes open, and you’ll find that Clampett works here.) The night watchman begins his rounds. This looks like a fun place to work. There’s a staircase that leads to a door too small for anyone to enter, and a sea star in a water cooler. Those rascally artists!

There seems to be a cartoonist still here. He’s working on the latest short for their newest star, Beans. (Making this the first “Looney Tune” to not feature Bosko or Buddy. Warner’s was just all about those B’s.) Yes, by this point Buddy had been abandoned, and I Haven’t got a Hat had come out, so it was time to see if this new character had what it took to be the star. (Porky won.) I will admit, it would have been cool if all this stuff that happens in the short was in live action, but the technology wasn’t there yet, and even if it was, we don’t need another “Coolworld.”

I don’t know what part of the short the man (Name time! I’ll call him Bob McClampet.) is working on, but it is a part where Beans had just been threatened by a beast, but had bars put in front of him, keeping him safe. I guess the short is done, because even though he said he needed to finish, Bob decides to sleep. (Sleep is best often enjoyed at your work) Seeing his chance, the beast grabs Bob and yanks him into the world of cartoons. With Beans still safely locked away, no one can save Bob. Oops.

Bob is dragged down to a room where all the cartoon villains are kept. (Which is right next to where the cartoon heroes are kept. You know them, they are what they’re supposed to be. Illusions of your fantasy.) And in a brilliant move, some of these guys actually appeared in previous Warner shorts. The “Mad Doctor” was the “Mad Musician” from “Buddy the Detective,” “One-punch Otto” the octopus appeared in “Mr. and Mrs. is the name;” even the beast who pulled Bob in appeared once. (Naturally, in 1934’s “Beauty and the Beast.”) They’re are plenty of original faces there too. Including Battling Barney the gender confused kangaroo. (Males don’t have pouches. Females aren’t called “Barney”) And Spike the spider. (Who doesn’t have the right number of legs. And has a beetle’s shell. And a nose. And… Oh wait! “Spike the spider” is probably just his wrestling name. Of course, that must be it.)

So why all the kidnapping? Seems they’re angry at Bob. In every picture he makes, they are the villains. Don’t get them wrong, they love doing what they do, but they don’t like how they are always the losers. So, they are going to make Bob kill himself. (Dang! A cartoonist’s nightmare indeed! Imagine being hated by your creations! Sure, this kind of situation would come back in “Fairly Odd Parents,” and the “Goosebumps” movie, but being forced to end your life? That’s harsh.) Seeing as how if he doesn’t comply, the rouges are probably just going to kill him themselves, Bob complies and begins drawing a pit.

Remember Beans? He is still in this short too. He’s just been given a loaf of bread by… somebody. Seriously, who is that? We never saw them! (I’m not using gender specific pronouns because I legit don’t know what gender they are.) They came from where Bob was taken. Are they one of the cartoon heroes? The ones who will last forever? I doubt it because we never see them again! Also, I guess Beans wasn’t too upset about his creator probably dying, as his face lights up at the thought of a snack. It’s a pretty comfy cell. As long as someone feeds him, he could stay there for years, no problem.

Okay, okay, back to the plot. Random character in a dress and bonnet hid a saw in the bread, and Beans begins to make his escape. Bob meanwhile, has drawn the pit, and is thrown in. And there is a crocodile in there, so he’s pretty much screwed. When Beans arrives, he finds the villains watching the action. They’re smart enough to make sure their plan works out. (Impressive!) Beans sends some boots to kick the beast, and the whole lot chases after the cat once he is spotted. (Well, at least they look evil. Brains don’t matter much.)

Beans sends the pencil down to Bob, who draws a ladder to get himself out. Then, with the use of a grease gun, Beans sends all four villains (no idea where all the rest went) sliding into their own trap. Bob then erases it. (Which is also pretty harsh. They’re trapped in a enclosed space with a dangerous reptile. Even if they manage to fight it off, they are going to starve. I hope the two heros are proud of themselves.)

Considering the smiles are their faces, I guess they are. They shake hands, which is really the night watchman shaking Bob awake. When the title said “nightmare” it meant it literally. Still, Bob is grateful for Beans’ help. To reward him, not only does he remove the beast and cell from the scene, but he draws him up a giant plate of dessert. (Ice Cream? Pudding? Custard? Maybe it’s all three.)

 

You don’t know what you’re doin’

“O.K. baby!”

Animation by Isadore Freleng and Norm Blackburn; Music by Gus Arnheim’s Brunswick Recording Orchestra. A Merrie Melody released on October 21, 1931.

With Foxy gone, we needed somebody to take the Merrie reigns. A character named Piggy was given a shot for two shorts, but afterwards Merrie Melodies weren’t stuck with just one character anymore. Piggy himself doesn’t have much of a personality to set him apart from other toons of the time. He stole a pair of Mickey’s pants, but that’s about the most interesting thing we know about him. (Please note: this Piggy is not related to the Piggy Hamhock who would appear later in the decade for a couple of shorts. Warner Bros. just had a thing for piggies.)

One night, hundreds of thousands of a crowd are heading for a night at a vaudeville theater. Piggy included. But first, he needs to pick up his girlfriend, Fluffy. (A great name. If their is one thing pigs are known for, it’s their thick fleecy coats.) They head to the show and listen to some of the music. But Piggy is a bit of a musical snob, and accuses the musicians of the title of the short. He figures he could do better, and takes the stage. I’m not a musician, so I can’t say for sure, but I think he sounds pretty good. I guess I’m in the minority, as the crowd isn’t too happy with him. Especially a trio of drunks.

Even though it’s clear they’ve been drinking, and their senses dulled, they think he kind of sucks. They sing the title theme, with Piggy arguing that they are just jealous, and the drunks continue to claim he has no talent. (Fluffy has just disappeared by this point, a shame that no one besides me is willing to defend her boyfriend) Eventually, the lead drunk (A name? How about… Tyler? Tipsy Tyler.) falls onto the stage. He breathes some booze breath at Piggy, and the stuff is potent enough to get him sauced as well.

Now, that he is a slave to the alcohol, Piggy takes the drunk’s drink and runs. With the wino in hot pursuit, Piggy pours some of the drink in a car, and tries to make a getaway. (Seeing as how he came to the theater in a scooter, he is clearly stealing now) For a creative touch, we see how the world looks through their eyes: the world is in waves. The road rises and falls, and it makes for a real wild ride. A clock dances, and a sewer grate becomes a monster. Piggy loses the car, and he and the drunk end up in  a pickup truck. Not wanting to carry them, the vehicle dumps the blissful drunks in a dump. (I think Piggy is going to be a little late picking Fluffy up)

What a fun short! Catchy music, trippy visuals, and fun gags! And so early in the Looney Tunes run! This proves they had what it took to make it in Hollywood. And look how it all turned out in the end. Possibly the most well known characters in animation history!

One More Time

“Oh, bologna!”

Animation by Isadore Freleng and Paul Smith; with Abe Lyman and His Brunswick Recording Orchestra. A Merrie Melody released on October 3, 1931.

Well, seems Walt wasn’t too fond of characters looking an awful lot like his own Mickey. Because of this, Foxy would only appear this “one more time.” Well, until he would appear decades later on Tiny Toons. By then people were extra careful to make him look different from a mouse. With pointier ears and snout. (But at least he wasn’t as blatant a rip off as Milton Mouse.)

(Disney may have killed him off rather quickly, but he’ll live forever in my nightmares)

For his last appearance, Foxy is a cop. And he patrols some pretty nasty streets. He is nearly killed several times. Either by being hit by car or just flat out being shot at. But he’s not unarmed. He has a gun that fires a mouse with a hammer at assailants. But even the non-criminal citizens are causing some trouble. Another hippo (this one speaks mostly in “wahs”) is having some road rage with another Mickey clone. (They are popping up everywhere today) Eventually, she accidentally runs over Foxy and he gives chase.

When she pulls over, she begs and pleads to not be given a ticket. Foxy doesn’t really buy her story, but he does forego on the ticket. (Instead, he just shoves her head in a trash can.) Roxy is making one more appearance too and her dog happily greets the scared vulpine. (Being several years before Disney would prove that a fox and a hound could get along, you can understand Foxy’s terror) The three take a break to enjoy some impromptu music.

Another hippo, meanwhile, has just been robbed. The cops give chase, with Foxy leading the pack. The criminal may seem pretty small, but after entering a pipe, he is not only larger, but accompanied by three other crooks. A grenade is hurled that takes care of the other officers. (I think it kills them. It at least knocked the flesh off their legs.) They also fox-nap Roxy which just gives Foxy even more reason to give chase. He takes a robot horse from a penny arcade and gets her back. With the criminals now chasing him, he tricks them into running into a prison. But he hasn’t completely won. The driver managed to escape and shoots Foxy in the butt. (What a way to make your final appearance!)